Archives For sxsw

 

SXSW 2018: At South by Southwest this week we skipped the buzzworthy Westworld experience to hear Facebook Global Creative Director Andrew Keller’s presentation on Facebook for brands in 2018, featuring tips on “astounding audiences” and nods to old school community management and groups. Quantcast’s Steven Pereira’s shared advice on how brands can use A.I. to analyze ad campaigns to get the right creative for right campaign. Obama’s former speechwriter, Sarada Peri, shared thoughts on persuasive communication (instead of adverbs use a better verb; instead of adjectives use a better noun). Elon Musk spoke on colonizing Mars to the benefits of a carbon tax, autonomous cars to the future of artificial intelligence (“AI is more dangerous than nukes”). And Esther Perel shared her insights on the state of modern love. It was an uplifting, educational and inspiring week. What a time to be alive, right?

China’s Xinhua Bookstore Retires Humans: Twenty new staff-less bookstores opened in Beijing this year, operating 24 hours a day and featuring an automated system with no regular human staff. These all-day bookstores are part of the book-selling Xinhua franchise, and are planned to be built at Beijing universities, government offices and malls. Customers enter their WeChat account details and get their faces scanned before entering, and the store offers “precise and humanized” book suggestions based on their purchase histories. The automated store even features a robot checkout helper, who is touted as a key feature of the store. RIP humans who sell books (as if they weren’t endangered enough already)! (LINK)

 

Drake Played Fortnite on Twitch and Broke the Internet: Forget March Madness, this week more than 600,000 people tuned in to watch Drake and others play a popular game on Twitch, a streaming service that allows people to watch others play video games. It was a record-breaking event and significant milestone for E-Sports, which continues to see exponential growth while more traditional sports (e.g., NFL, Olympics) face audience downturns. This particular Fortnite smackdown also involved pro-gamer Tyler “Ninja” Blevins, NFL player JuJu Smith-Schuster and rapper Travis Scott. This week Amazon announced it will offer free Twitch games for Prime Customers , so look for even more mainstreaming of this E-Sports phenomenon into 2018. (LINK)

Google Lens and Maps and Mario Updates: Using a new button in Google Photos, users can now ask Google AI to analyze the subject and turn the data into action automatically. For example, with Google Lens you can take a picture of a business card and Google Lens will save the phone number to your contact list. Also this week it was announced Google is opening up Maps so game developers can create the next Pokémon Go. And In honor of Mario’s birthday, Nintendo partnered with Google and added a feature to navigate your streets as Mario in Mario Kart. Watch out for banana peels!

Here’s how to get Mario on your Google Maps:

  1. Update to the latest version of Google Maps (App Store on iPhones or Google Play on Androids).
  2. Enter a location you want to go.
  3. Click on Directions.
  4. Instead of pressing “Start,” press the “?” next to it.
  5. Oh yeah! Mario Time!

Advertisements

Google Tiltbrush Painting SXSW

IS THIS YOUR FIRST TIME ATTENDING SXSW?

I’m a SXSW old-timer at this point. This will be my 11th year attending. I’ve spoken four times and am now on the SXSW Advisory Board. I directly credit this event, the people I’ve met there, and the things I’ve learned with impacting my career in significant ways.

But you have to put a lot in to get a lot out.

So in 2014 I curated this extensive First-timer SXSW advice from the Pros post. There are lots of good insights there from a host of friends who attend each year. Otherwise, my must-do’s for 2018 are below…

Greg’s advice for first-time SXSW attendees:

  • Seek out the smartest, weirdest, most disruptive topics and experiences you could not get back home. The curation of breakthrough content and thinkers at SXSW is amazing — take advantage.
  • Do not go to any sessions that are essentially case studies you could read about online. Instead, make a note for yourself to go read those when you get home.
  • Do not go to any sessions where you yourself could be on the panel. You’re already a subject matter expert. Go learn something new!
  • Do not to go any sessions with a movie, television or social media celebrity. In my experience the lines are huge, the content isn’t great, and there’s probably a niche session down the hall that you’ll get more value from.
  • If a session sucks, get up and walk out immediately. You picked the crappy session, but you don’t have to sit there for an hour being pissed. Literally look at the rooms next to your session, and I bet there’s something of value nearby.
  • Go to everything early, and expect to wait in line. Lines are real. If there’s one session you care a lot about, schedule your day around getting into it.
  • Bring battery backups for your devices. This seems obvious until you’re sitting nowhere near a power adapter and realize you’re on low battery mode.
  • Eat a big breakfast. Lunch breaks can be hit or miss, depending on the sessions you pick. A protein bar in your bag will help.
  • Wear comfortable walking shoes. By the second day you’ll be glad you did.
  • Bring a jacket that can tolerate rain. Austin isn’t really built for downpours and many event venues are designed around patios or open air courtyards. Stay dry!
  • Network like crazy. Don’t hang out with your crew from back home. Meet and befriend creatives, innovators and disruptors. This is just as valuable as the content.
  • Eat a good dinner each night. Make dinner reservations in advance and invite strangers you meet during the day to hang out and share what they heard during the day. You can’t hit every session, but this gives you an exponential window into what you missed.
  • Spend a day when you get home processing, writing and sharing your takeaways (and formally connecting with the amazing people you met). That stack of business cards in the corner was all for naught if you don’t get those into LinkedIn!
  • Lastly, if you aren’t willing to put in the effort for an amazing experience, stay home next year and complain about it on social with everyone else. SXSW didn’t jump the shark. Lots of people just missed the point of putting in the work to get a lot out of it.

Want to hang out? Best way to hook up is text — 612-845-1020.

See you in Austin!


For more than 20 years the South by Southwest (SXSW) Interactive Festival has catalyzed creativity, technology and innovation for thousands of global attendees each March in Austin, Texas.

SXSW was the birthplace of emerging user behaviors like the digital backchannel (Twitter), geolocation wayfinding (Foursquare, now Swarm), group chat (Beluga, now Messenger) and social streaming (Meerkat, now Facebook Live). I’ve attended 11 years, presented four times, and now serve on the SXSW Advisory Board, helping develop programming that ensures our thousands of attendees get an experience that leads up to the conference’s legacy.

Last year, space150 hosted a panel on Deep Web and Dark Social (CBS News coverage of our panel), focusing on the changing habits of users sharing more 1:1 and using chat apps instead of public social networks. A year later, that POV proved to be extremely fortuitious, and “dark social was mentioned in any panel that covered social media in 2017.

This year space150 was again excited to produce a panel focusing on emerging consumer behaviors and technology. This one covered the evolution of consumer engagement through emerging consumer tech products, namely Snap Spectacles.

We highlighted our case study in using two of the first pairs to: 1) introduce Spectacles to pro sports for the first time with the Minnesota Wild, and 2) partner with Nike to bring POV trick shot footage through Spectacles to the NBA All-Star game, and more.

Our Chief Innovation Officer, Marc Jensen, and I also attended keynotes and sessions, explored brand activations, and participated in VIP preview events throughout the week.

We have prepared a full presentation on takeaways from the event — specifically covering the future of VR/AR/360, artificial intelligence, innovation labs, and the future of mobile behavior.

If you’re interested in seeing our presentation, hit me up!

spectacles minnesota wild

I’m excited to share our panel at South by Southwest 2017 — Game Changer: Spectacles Come to Sports, telling the story of how we got one of the first pairs of Snapchat Spectacles and partnered with the Minnesota Wild and Sports Illustrated to explore POV storytelling.

On Thanksgiving Eve, the Minnesota Wild became the first pro sports team to incorporate Snapchat Spectacles into their social engagement strategy, ushering in a new era of tech-fueled fan engagement worldwide. But we’ve seen POV video experimentation in social and wearable media before (Google Glass, GoPro), and it can be difficult for marketing leads to weigh the next big thing with approved content strategies and strict league policies. What is a game changer and what’s just a fad? Join digital leads from the Wild, SportTechie and space150 for a conversation about what’s next in sports tech media, stadium experiences, and fan engagement.

We present on Monday, March 13 at 2 p.m. 

IS THIS YOUR FIRST TIME ATTENDING SXSW?

In 2014 I curated this extensive First-timer SXSW advice from the Pros post that’s worth checking out if you’re a newbie this year. Lots of good insights there from a host of friends who attend each year. Otherwise, my must-do’s are below…

Greg’s advice for first-time SXSW attendees:

  • Seek out the smartest, weirdest, most disruptive topics and experiences you could not get back home.
  • Do not go to any of your own company or client’s sessions unless you absolutely must. It’s a wasted hour.
  • Do not go to any sessions that are essentially case studies you could read about online.
  • Do not go to any sessions where you yourself could be on the panel.
  • Do not to go any sessions with a movie, television or social media celebrity.
  • If a session sucks, get up and walk out immediately. You picked the crappy session, but you don’t have to sit there for an hour being pissed.
  • Go to everything early, and expect to wait in line.
  • Bring battery backups for your devices.
  • Eat a big breakfast.
  • Wear comfortable walking shoes.
  • Bring a jacket that can tolerate rain.
  • Network like crazy. Don’t hang out with your crew from back home. Meet and befriend creatives, innovators and disrupters.
  • Eat a good dinner each night. Make dinner reservations in advance and invite strangers you meet during the day to hang out and process after the sessions wrap.
  • Spend a day when you get home processing, writing and sharing your takeaways (and formally connecting with the amazing people you met).
  • Lastly, if you aren’t willing to put in the effort for an amazing experience, stay home next year and complain about it on Twitter with everyone else. And maybe rethink your career track.

Want to hang out? Best way to hook up is text — 612-845-1020.

See you in Austin!

Greg Swan SXSW

I’ve blogged at-length about the importance of South by Southwest and its effect on my career. I’ve reached the decade mark in attending this conference every March, and it seriously gets better every year.

This year, I was thrilled to be named to the SXSW Advisory Board and have a hand selecting sessions for the Intelligent Future track. It was so exciting to read all of the submissions and have a role in curating which would be on display across program in Austin.

In addition, I’m excited to share I’m also presenting alongside Marc Jensen, my spaceLab partner and space150’s Chief Innovation Officer.

It’s my fourth time presenting at the conference, and this one is extremely different than the others…

Links Worth Clicking:

Interview snippet:

Why should attendees prioritize your talk?
Since the PanelPicker went live, we’ve seen Tumblr launch private instant messaging, Twitter expand direct messages to more than 140 characters, and Snapchat launch new tools to enable dark social engagement. We’ve also had millions of children’s data and head shots released in a huge data leak in deep web. By March, attendees will need to be reconciling the new shift away from public social and indexed web, to considering how consumer behavior back to private channels where it all began (chat! message boards! texts!) and then beyond — into the darker, more sinister realms of the human psyche as it manifests online.

We speak opposite President Obama’s keynote. I wish him well filling his room going up Marc and I as competition.

IS THIS YOUR FIRST TIME ATTENDING SXSW?

In 2014 I curated an extensive First-timer SXSW advice from the Pros post that’s worth checking out if you’re a newbie this year. Lots of good insights there from a host of friends who attend each year. Otherwise, my must-do’s are below…

Greg’s advice for first-time SXSW attendees:

  • Seek out the smartest, weirdest, most disruptive topics and experiences you could not get back home.
  • Do not go to any of your own company or client’s sessions unless you absolutely must. It’s a wasted hour.
  • Do not go to any sessions that are essentially case studies you could read about online.
  • Do not go to any sessions where you yourself could be on the panel.
  • Do not to go any sessions with a movie, television or social media celebrity.
  • If a session sucks, get up and walk out immediately. You picked the crappy session, but you don’t have to sit there for an hour being pissed.
  • Again, seek out the smartest, weirdest, most disruptive topics and experiences you could not get back home.
  • Go to everything early, and expect to wait in line.
  • Bring battery backups for your devices.
  • Eat a big breakfast.
  • Wear comfortable walking shoes.
  • Bring a jacket that can tolerate rain.
  • Network like crazy. Don’t hang out with your crew from back home. Meet and befriend creatives, innovators and disrupters.
  • Eat a good dinner each night. Make dinner reservations in advance and invite strangers you meet during the day to hang out and process after the sessions wrap.
  • Spend a day when you get home processing, writing and sharing your takeaways (and formally connecting with the amazing people you met).
  • Lastly, if you aren’t willing to put in the effort for an amazing experience, stay home next year and complain about it on Twitter with everyone else. And maybe rethink your career track.

Want to hang out? Best way to hook up is text — 612-845-1020.

See you in Austin!

Google Glass Explorer Meetup 2014 SXSWThis was my eighth year attending South by Southwest Interactive (SXSW) in Austin, TX, and the expectations were high.

The key theme I took away from SXSW 2013 was “Exponential Thinking, Exponential Opportunities,” and capitalizing on that thinking and opportunity, the main theme I took from SXSW this year was “Quit looking to others for the next big thing. Go make it yourself.

If you followed the media attention on this year’s SXSW closely, you surely noticed there wasn’t a breakout app or innovation this year. The whole “What’s the next Twitter?” expectation has grown tired for many of us longtime attendees, but the notion isn’t as misdirected as one may think.

The opening and closing keynote presentations indirectly addressed that expectation, plus the question of whose responsibility it is to create innovation that impacts society. But there’s a twist to the tone for addressing those questions in 2014.

You see, these kinds of events aren’t about the breakouts and newsmakers…. they are about the community that inevitably designs, builds and launches the breakouts — and the people who become the newsmakers. It’s about the community who comes together, at least once a year, to connect, share, learn and collaborate.

Opening keynote presenter and artist Austin Kleon shared Brian Eno’s concept of Scenius (genius coming from a collaboration of a group, culture or movement; a community that is critical to support all amazing ideas and big thinkers).

Closing keynote presenter and futurist Bruce Sterling told of the need to mature beyond nostalgia for the past. And as I attended sessions, met new people and experienced new interactive milestones between the opening and closing keynotes, I concluded that we should stop looking for the “next Twitter” or “next Foursquare” or “next Zuckerberg” at these events, and go make something ourselves.

Because after all, this is our scenius. This our collaborative community. This community has created great things in the past, and it will again. But only if we put the onus on ourselves.

So in the spirit of the scenius of 2014, I treated the conference differently in a number of ways:

    Lauren Melcher, Lindsi Gish, Amanda Long, Angie Gassett, Steffen Ryan, Nathan Wright, Greg Swan

  • Introduced myself to fellow attendees without mentioning what I did and where I worked, and asked the same of them. It forced us to dig deep into who we are, what we’re creating, and who we want to be.
  • Held a number of “stranger dinners,” where I invited people — those I had just met, people I know from back home I never see, and people I genuinely want to know better — to stop, have dinner, process what they heard in sessions that day, and clear the dishes to have a discussion.
  • Sought out 1:1 time with my coworkers, particularly those I see so rarely from our network, to connect, offer help and seek advice.
  • Made time apart from or in lieu of panels to attend things like the Google Glass Explorer Meetup, SXSXinspiration Meetup, and Facebook’s Politics, Government and Non-Profits Networking Meetup, taking the initiative to meet new people and foster new connections with those attending the conference officially with a badge — as well as those unofficially enjoying the non-conference events on the fringe.
  • Journaled some ideas for never-been-done-before things I want to build in the coming year.

And here are some of the favorite things we discussed as the 2014 “scenius” gathered in Austin this year:

    Greg Swan 3D Printed Bust and Face

  • You can’t fight technology’s progress. And we should work to adapt our society to leverage new technology.
  • White collar, repetitive knowledge workers will be replaced by automation, just as robots replaced blue collar, manufacturing workers.
  • No great artist or filmmaker ever referred to their works as “content.”
  • We can record the biometrics of everyone in the world in the cloud — and still have plenty of storage left for all of human history.
  • The importance of privacy, personal data and abuse from government.
  • The state of curiosity is a measure of intelligence.
  • The future of ethical programming for autonomous experiences.
  • The risk of legislators creating laws about technology they don’t understand.
  • The cultural dissonance of technology that comes from the introduction of new devices.

Pretty great topics, right? Oh, and I also got 3D scanned and printed. That was a first.

Overall, another amazing year. I came back energized and excited for what’s to come in 2014. Let’s go make something!

Full notes (via Twitter) broken out by session/topic after the jump!

Continue Reading…

Wolfram Connected Devices Project: curated list of Internet of Things