I did three interviews about Pokemon Go this summer, and in each interview I talked at-length about the “Black Swan” moment that was occurring with augmented reality’s (AR) rapid adoption and awareness.

None of those quotes made it into the coverage, which honestly kind of bummed me out.

However, we’re already seeing Pokemon Go’s impact on the acceptance and excitement about a digital layer atop the real world (aka mixed reality) become rationalized in hindsight — as if this was an expected adoption by the mainstream.

So it’s no surprise that Tim Cook — maker of the super computer in each of our pockets that can pull that digital layer atop the world wherever we go — is bullish for AR and what’s next.

PREDICTION: We’re going to see publishers and brands start building AR layers into their mobile apps yet in 2016. Then in 2017 this trend is going to be so overblown and undervalued (although hitting even more of the mainstream than Pokemon) that there will be a constriction of use with occasionaly sparks of genius utility and creativity. By Q3 2017 — a year from today — a handful of perfectly placed solutions will finally demonstrate the full breadth (and limits) of AR in marketing, utility and culture.

…..

Augmented reality — games and applications that impose digital imagery over real-life video — has exploded onto the consumer tech scene in recent months, most notably with this summer’s hit mobile video game Pokémon Go, which overlays the game’s characters onto images taken in real time from the camera on the player’s phone.

It stands in contrast to virtual reality, which often employs a special headset and only digital imagery, which does not depend on the environment around the user. Virtual reality has been championed by news companies like ABC News and The New York Times, who have used it to tell immersive stories in ways not available in traditional media.

While Pokémon Go and other AR apps are currently available for Apple’s iPhone, Apple itself has not yet produced any of its own AR or VR products.

Source: Exclusive: Why Apple CEO Tim Cook Prefers Augmented Reality Over Virtual Reality – ABC News

Down is up and up is down….

Eyeo GmbH, the company that makes the popular Adblock Plus software, will today start selling the very thing many of its users hate — advertisements.

Source:

If you want to know what’s next, there are two things to always pay attention to — patents and art…



Today, a patent has been awarded to Apple for a “Head-Mounted Display Apparatus For Retaining A Portable Electronic Device With Display.”

Source: Apple Awarded Patent For Wireless VR HMD That Works With The iPhone

“The strongest force propelling human progress has been the swift advance and wide diffusion of technology.” — The Economist

Source: Eleven Reasons To Be Excited About The Future of Technology – Medium

Technology is strongest force propelling human progress

Eleven Reasons To Be Excited About The Future of Technology

Revisiting The Cult of Done Manifesto every so often is always worth it.

For more than a year I’ve been downloading my Snapchat stories each day, then uploading them to Facebook (with Privacy settings at “Just Me”).

While I love the concept of disposable media and data impermanence, I also wanted to save a lot of those memories to relive later. Especially of my small kids.

Source: Snapchat introduces Memories: a searchable, shareable archive of your snaps | The Verge

We live in the most amazing times.

“In other words: Warner had just DMCA’d an artificial reconstruction of a film about artificial intelligence being indistinguishable from humans, because it couldn’t distinguish between the simulation and the real thing.”

Source: A guy trained a machine to “watch” Blade Runner. Then things got seriously sci-fi. – Vox

Great read from danah boyd on this ridiculous assertion that Mark Zuckerberg’s leadership will keep Facebook neutral.

Algorithms can’t be unbiased because they are programmed by biased humans, for starters…

What is of concern right now is not that human beings are playing a role in shaping the news — they always have — it is the veneer of objectivity provided by Facebook’s interface, the claims of neutrality enabled by the integration of algorithmic processes, and the assumption that what is prioritized reflects only the interests and actions of the users (the “public sphere”) and not those of Facebook, advertisers, or other powerful entities.

Source: Facebook Must Be Accountable to the Public — Data & Society: Points