I’ve been hearing rumors about this for nearly a year, including multiple off-the-record discussions with people in the know.

Apple will be launching an augmented-reality phone this fall, and AR-glasses (if not this fall, in 2018).

Imagine Google Glass + Microsoft Hololens + Snap Spectacles, at an affordable price point and with functionality within the iOS ecosystem.

At SXSW earlier this month, my friend Robert Scoble told me, “It’s insane we’re at the biggest interactive conference in the world, and nobody is talking about Apple. A year from today, this is all anyone will be talking about.

Brands who aren’t experimenting with AR today will be behind when Apple goes all-in with AR later this year. The time to start is today!

Apple is working on several AR products, including digital spectacles that could connect wirelessly to an iPhone and beam content—movies, maps and more—to the wearer. While the glasses are a ways off, AR features could show up in the iPhone sooner.

Over time, Munster says, AR devices will replace the iPhone. “It’s something they need to do to continue to grow,” he says, “and defend against the shift in how people use hardware.”

Augmented reality is the less known cousin of virtual reality. VR gets more attention because it completely immerses users in an artificial world and has an obvious attraction for gamers. So far, however, headsets like the Oculus and HoloLens are niche rather than mainstream products. Apple believes AR will be an easier sell because it’s less intrusive. Referring to VR headsets, Cook last year said he thought few people will want to be “enclosed in something.”

Source: Apple’s Next Big Thing: Augmented Reality – Bloomberg


For more than 20 years the South by Southwest (SXSW) Interactive Festival has catalyzed creativity, technology and innovation for thousands of global attendees each March in Austin, Texas.

SXSW was the birthplace of emerging user behaviors like the digital backchannel (Twitter), geolocation wayfinding (Foursquare, now Swarm), group chat (Beluga, now Messenger) and social streaming (Meerkat, now Facebook Live). I’ve attended 11 years, presented four times, and now serve on the SXSW Advisory Board, helping develop programming that ensures our thousands of attendees get an experience that leads up to the conference’s legacy.

Last year, space150 hosted a panel on Deep Web and Dark Social (CBS News coverage of our panel), focusing on the changing habits of users sharing more 1:1 and using chat apps instead of public social networks. A year later, that POV proved to be extremely fortuitious, and “dark social was mentioned in any panel that covered social media in 2017.

This year space150 was again excited to produce a panel focusing on emerging consumer behaviors and technology. This one covered the evolution of consumer engagement through emerging consumer tech products, namely Snap Spectacles.

We highlighted our case study in using two of the first pairs to: 1) introduce Spectacles to pro sports for the first time with the Minnesota Wild, and 2) partner with Nike to bring POV trick shot footage through Spectacles to the NBA All-Star game, and more.

Our Chief Innovation Officer, Marc Jensen, and I also attended keynotes and sessions, explored brand activations, and participated in VIP preview events throughout the week.

We have prepared a full presentation on takeaways from the event — specifically covering the future of VR/AR/360, artificial intelligence, innovation labs, and the future of mobile behavior.

If you’re interested in seeing our presentation, hit me up!

spectacles minnesota wild

I’m excited to share our panel at South by Southwest 2017 — Game Changer: Spectacles Come to Sports, telling the story of how we got one of the first pairs of Snapchat Spectacles and partnered with the Minnesota Wild and Sports Illustrated to explore POV storytelling.

On Thanksgiving Eve, the Minnesota Wild became the first pro sports team to incorporate Snapchat Spectacles into their social engagement strategy, ushering in a new era of tech-fueled fan engagement worldwide. But we’ve seen POV video experimentation in social and wearable media before (Google Glass, GoPro), and it can be difficult for marketing leads to weigh the next big thing with approved content strategies and strict league policies. What is a game changer and what’s just a fad? Join digital leads from the Wild, SportTechie and space150 for a conversation about what’s next in sports tech media, stadium experiences, and fan engagement.

We present on Monday, March 13 at 2 p.m. 

IS THIS YOUR FIRST TIME ATTENDING SXSW?

In 2014 I curated this extensive First-timer SXSW advice from the Pros post that’s worth checking out if you’re a newbie this year. Lots of good insights there from a host of friends who attend each year. Otherwise, my must-do’s are below…

Greg’s advice for first-time SXSW attendees:

  • Seek out the smartest, weirdest, most disruptive topics and experiences you could not get back home.
  • Do not go to any of your own company or client’s sessions unless you absolutely must. It’s a wasted hour.
  • Do not go to any sessions that are essentially case studies you could read about online.
  • Do not go to any sessions where you yourself could be on the panel.
  • Do not to go any sessions with a movie, television or social media celebrity.
  • If a session sucks, get up and walk out immediately. You picked the crappy session, but you don’t have to sit there for an hour being pissed.
  • Go to everything early, and expect to wait in line.
  • Bring battery backups for your devices.
  • Eat a big breakfast.
  • Wear comfortable walking shoes.
  • Bring a jacket that can tolerate rain.
  • Network like crazy. Don’t hang out with your crew from back home. Meet and befriend creatives, innovators and disrupters.
  • Eat a good dinner each night. Make dinner reservations in advance and invite strangers you meet during the day to hang out and process after the sessions wrap.
  • Spend a day when you get home processing, writing and sharing your takeaways (and formally connecting with the amazing people you met).
  • Lastly, if you aren’t willing to put in the effort for an amazing experience, stay home next year and complain about it on Twitter with everyone else. And maybe rethink your career track.

Want to hang out? Best way to hook up is text — 612-845-1020.

See you in Austin!

I am a futurist, and I am actually pretty good at it, as I am old enough now to know that the things that make me happiest are always surprises. I’ve had a bunch of people work on robots for my entire adult lifetime. I have a robot in my basement, and he is my best pal. I know what he smells like. I am not surprised by him. And I don’t jump up and down for joy because I have a commercial robot in the basement of my lab. It is just reality. What really interests me and surprises me is stuff that’s completely off the wall.

Advanced technology is not always going to seem good the first time, it’s like clouds and silver lining: every silver lining has a cloud. I am a guy in a computerised generation. I know it is not going to be perfect. A tree is not going to grow to the sky. But something else is going to happen.

Source: Automated Amenities | DisegnoDaily

“It’s not should we change, it’s how do we change.”


“The main goal isn’t simply to maximize revenue from advertising—the strategy that keeps the lights on and the content free at upstarts like the Huffington Post, BuzzFeed, and Vox. It’s to transform the Times’ digital subscriptions into the main engine of a billion-dollar business, one that could pay to put reporters on the ground in 174 countries even if (OK, when) the printing presses stop forever. To hit that mark, the Times is embarking on an ambitious plan inspired by the strategies of Netflix, Spotify, and HBO: invest heavily in a core offering (which, for the Times, is journalism) while continuously adding new online services and features (from personalized fitness advice and interactive newsbots to virtual reality films) so that a subscription becomes indispensable to the lives of its existing subscribers and more attractive to future ones.


“We think that there are many, many, many, many people—millions of people all around the world—who want what The New York Times offers,” says Dean Baquet, the Times’ executive editor. “And we believe that if we get those people, they will pay, and they will pay greatly.”





4chan: The Skeleton Key to the Rise of Trump (30 minute read!!!)

In other words, Trump is 4chan.
Trump is steering into the skid embodied.
Trump is Pepe.
Trump is loserdom embraced.
Trump is the loser who has won, the pathetic little frog on the big strong body.
Trump’s ventures of course, represent this fantasy: this hope that the working man, against the odds dictated by his knowledge, experience, or hard work will one day strike it rich — Trump University, late night real estate schemes, the casinos. Trump himself, who inherited his wealth, represents the classic lucky sap.
But Trump also equally represents the knowledge that all of that is a lie, a scam that’s much older than you are, a fantasy that we can dwell in though it will never become true, like a video game.
Trump, in other words, is a way of owning and celebrating being taken advantage of.





The Mark Zuckerberg Manifesto Is a Blueprint for Destroying Journalism

A sprawling new manifesto by Zuckerberg, published to Facebook on Thursday, should set off new alarm bells for journalists, and heighten news organizations’ sense of urgency about how they—and their industry—can survive in a Facebook-dominated world…


Most news organizations would describe themselves the way Zuckerberg describes Facebook—as “not just technology or media, but a community of people,” and dedicated to helping people stay “engaged with the issues that matter to them every day.” In some ways, Zuckerberg is building a news organization without journalists.


In other words, Facebook is building a global newsroom run by robot editors and its own readers.