Mary Meeker’s famous annual Internet Trends presentation was today.

Although never presented very clearly (in a creative sense), this is one of the most important milestones of aggregating trend data in our industry each year.

By this time tomorrow, you will see countless digital/advertising trades recutting and summarizing this data in their coverage. And insights held in this presentation will serve as a reference point throughout the rest of 2015.

See all 197 slides in their ugly glory here:

“Some brands — notably Red Bull, Squarespace and Converse — have found ways to partner with musicians without infiltrating their works…

So to a degree, ‘selling out’ can be creatively liberating. But there’s a difference between selling a partnership and selling part of your song’s message — the part that a listener trusts and needs to connect with. Consumers need to look at branding in lyrics with extreme skepticism. They should look to support acts that only use brands to establish an artistic identity, not solely a financial one.”

Pop Music Is More About Advertising Now Than Before — And Nobody Realizes It.

We are on the edge of change comparable to the rise of human life on Earth. — Vernor Vinge

The AI Revolution: Road to Superintelligence – Wait But Why.

All content needs to be made interesting. What you’re doing as a writer is introducing variable rewards into your story. Everything that engages us, all pieces of content are engineered to be interesting,” he said. “Movies aren’t real life, books aren’t real life, your article isn’t real life. It’s manufactured to pull us one sentence after another through mystery, through the unknown. It’s a slot machine. Your article is a slot machine. It has to be variable. So just because an experience introduces variability and mystery — that’s good!”

Slot machines perfected addictive gaming. Now, tech wants their tricks | The Verge.

The Percolate Blog: The Seven Most Important Psychology Studies for Marketers

“With the legacy social networks crossing the decade mark and prioritizing monetization over organic reach, it’s time for brands to reevaluate their approach to Always-On content.

For example, “National Doughnut Day” shouldn’t be part of your content strategy this summer, unless your company sells donuts.

Instead, audience insights, corporate priorities, time of year and publisher format should all inform your editorial calendar and your paid promotion plan to ensure the right consumers will see your content.

Every action should generate measurable awareness or drive conversions beyond the vanity metrics on the mainstream social media channels.” —Greg Swan, space150

via 5 online best practices for businesses | Minnesota Business Magazine.

So instead of just seeing your shares in buckets (100 Facebook, 50 Twitter, 30 LinkedIn, etc.) you see exactly how that content spread in a tangled web from it’s original sharer to other channels.

BuzzFeed Just Cracked the Code on How Social Content Spreads, and It’s a Big Deal.

See also:
Introducing Pound: Process for Optimizing and Understanding Network Diffusion

The Sound of Wikipedia Being Edited

They livin’ it up at the Hotel California
What a nice surprise
Bring your alibis

Social platforms have become a digital “Hotel California,” argues Victor Pineiro, vp of social media at Big Spaceship: You can check out any time you want, but you can never leave. From Facebook to Instagram to Snapchat, it seems every new feature is designed to keep you inside the platform’s walled garden, taking in its content (and its ads).

What’s a marketer to do? Pineiro suggests brands and agencies use social networks first and foremost for relationship-building, branding and awareness – rather than as a tool driving to purchase.

Navigating the 'Hotel California' effect of social platforms.

Lifecasting isn’t new, but today’s tools enable citizen-broadcasting + voyeurism on an unprecedented scale.

It’s important to understand the lessons and pitfalls of our recent history in this era. And of course, Jennicam is the Godmother of this…

We’re Tweeting and Facebooking and Periscoping more of our lives than ever before. But all of these media give us the opportunity to tailor our online presence. To only portray the best, sexiest, smartest moments. Jenni showed us everything. The good, the bad, the exciting, the mundane. She gave control of her online life over to the public and the technology that broadcast it. It was adventurous in a way that even the most public facing lifecaster these days would not dare to be.

via Jennicam And The Birth Of ‘Lifecasting’.