Archives For disposable media

For more than a year I’ve been downloading my Snapchat stories each day, then uploading them to Facebook (with Privacy settings at “Just Me”).

While I love the concept of disposable media and data impermanence, I also wanted to save a lot of those memories to relive later. Especially of my small kids.

Source: Snapchat introduces Memories: a searchable, shareable archive of your snaps | The Verge

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I’ve been a vocal advocate (opposite of critic!) for disposable media apps like Snapchat and Facebook for some time.

A recent report from BI Intelligence shows that among the 544 million daily photos uploaded in May 2013, 28 percent of those were Snapchat — beating Instagram and Flickr handily.

snapchat popularity

 

As Bob Lefsetz said in his post Facebook is For Old People, “The oldsters are rarely early adopters. They know the value of money, they’re set in their ways. For all the old bloviators bemoaning the loss of privacy online, it’s the kids who got the memo, that if they post pictures of illicit activity they might not get a job in the future. Kids believe in evanescence, oldsters believe in the permanent record. Ergo, the growth of Snapchat.”

 

In fact, once I hit the renewal date on my Flickr Premium account, I never renewed. And now I’ve forgotten the password. I still love Flickr, but I don’t use it — and send 10x more Snapchat and Facebook Poke photos than I publicly publish to the social web.

You would think the track record of social network migration (i.e. users emigrating from Compuserve to AOL, AOL to Friendster, Friendster to MySpace, more recently MySpace to Facebook) would have established a trend of cyclical change which we marketers would anticipate and embrace. But for some reason it seems like our clients and peers are always surprised when online behavior changes, new destinations gain traction, and popular networks lose daily active users.

A new survey by Piper Jaffray offers the latest news bite that will have our industry and clients asking us questions about social marketing programs on current and emerging socnets.

Via Buzzfeed:

Facebook is the “most important” social media site for about 10% fewer teenagers than it was a year ago. The teens surveyed are less interested in Twitter, YouTube, Google+, Flickr and Tumblr, too. Of the major sites included in the survey, only Pinterest has grown. (Instagram was not included in the survey in Spring of 2012). This suggests something bigger than a shift away from Facebook; it hints at what could be the beginning of an across-the-board teen rejection of traditional social networking as a whole. But where are young people going? The survey includes some notable write-ins, which are presented almost as a footnote.

But they might explain what’s going on:
piper graphic

The sites that are either ascendant, holding steady or holding relatively strong are feed-heavy and profile-light; the sites that seem to be hit hardest are those that have a more traditional, MySpace-y structures, centered around a detailed profile. (Tumblr is the odd exception here.)

The biggest “write-in” services aren’t really social networks in the way Facebook is a social network. Snapchat and Kik are messaging services. While they might be able to draw teens’ attention away from Facebook, they have little funcional overlap.

This data measures sentiment, not usage stats. If this data is solid, though, we should see it reflected in an teen exodus from traditional social networks.

While I strongly believe Vine and disposable media socnets like Snapchat, Kik and Poke satisfy important emerging consumer behaviors, we shouldn’t discount the effectiveness of mass socnets like Facebook and Twitter – just as we don’t discount the effective of mass media channels like television and newspapers to meet specific client needs. Particularly with Facebook’s new targeting offerings, we can now laser target client messages like never before.

In summary, depending on your brand’s measurable objectives, you should recommend and utilize the most appropriate channel to best meet their audiences.

What works today may not work next year, and I personally think that’s AWESOME.

Research:
“Taking Stock with Teens” study (pdf)

Bonus links:
The New Yorker: Delete This When You’re Done
Are disposable media platforms like Snapchat and Poke the future of social media?

greg swan wcco disposable social media snapchat facebook poke

Weber Shandwick’s VP of Interactive Greg Swan tracks social media trends. Even he can’t predict where kids will end up next, but he says parents should still try. It should be not to spy, but to understand the issues their kids face as new apps keep emerging.

“There are definitely some apps parents are not going to find any reward in: poking each other or sending snap shot pictures of each other, but I encourage them to try it and figure it out,” said Swan.

That may be the key to security in this new media world: focusless on backseat driving, and more on teaching the rules of the road….

Swan added that he actually likes this new wave of disposable media because unless somebody saves a screen shot, those stupid pictures kids may be tempted to post won’t stay around to haunt them in the future.

Watch the piece here.