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Good reminder from Dave Knox

While the largest companies were trying to figure out how to use digital as a new advertising tool, a new generation of companies and brands was being started by entrepreneurs that viewed digital as a business model that would give them an advantage versus the scale and budgets of their much larger competitors.

In the old world, brands competed with each other head-on, whether that was trying to win at the First Moment of Truth with the largest share of shelf or creating the television ad with the most buzz during the Super Bowl. In this new high-stakes game of business, startups have decided to throw out the old rules. They are not attacking their competitors head-on.  Instead, they are disregarding the conventional wisdom of industries and in many cases, redefining markets along the way.

In the same way that the majority of today’s Fortune 500 were born in the era of mass media and mass retail, these new rivals have started with digital at the core of their business model.

It is no longer a battle of Goliath vs. Goliath where everyone is playing with the same cards and the same set of rules. Instead, brand leaders need to evolve to thrive in a game of business where the competition is fluid and new players can emerge seemingly overnight.

Source: The New Ways Established Brands Do Battle With Startups – Adweek

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“I love advertising because I love lying…

I just want to enjoy the commercial….

We know the product is going to stink. We know that because we live in the world, and we know that everything stinks. We all believe, ‘Hey, maybe this one won’t stink.’

We are a hopeful species. Stupid but hopeful.

But we’re happy in that moment between the commercial and the purchase.

And I think spending your life trying to dupe innocent people out of hard-won earnings to buy useless, low-quality, misrepresented items and services is an excellent use of your energy.”

–Jerry Seinfeld, 55th Clio Awards

Watch it here.

via Jerry Seinfeld Gets Brutally Honest About Advertising in This Hilarious Speech at the Clios | Adweek.

The analogy I’ve used for years is: Don’t build houses on rented land. But this one is way better…

“Brands will always have more control over owned spaces than rented ones,” Thomas said. “By and large, I view owned spaces as the farm and rented spaces as the market where you sell the crops—you can personalize your stall, but you can’t design the market.”

via Brand Publishers That Want to Own Their Data Are Ditching Facebook for Microsites | Adweek.

That’s not to say social isn’t important. It’s critical. But if you put all of your efforts into a platform you don’t own, you’re at the mercy of platform architects – and their prerogative to monetize, change algorithm or disrupt design.

Every piece of communication that companies create is potentially an asset that can be shared. Every piece of communication can help dimensionalize a company, further define its brands and tighten bonds with customers. But very few have that kind of macro perspective on and exposure to all the content they produce. At larger companies, which are often siloed and matrixed, few people even think about the kinds of content that can be shared with customers.

via Companies Need a Head of Content Strategy, Creation and Distribution | Adweek.

Adweek: Companies Need a Head of Content Strategy, Creation and Distribution

A survey of journalists shows 39 percent consider themselves “digital first,” meaning that they publish news as it breaks rather than waiting for the next print issue, which means 61 percent of journalists are still thinking about traditional channels. About half believe their biggest audiences are online, so perhaps that’s quelling the adoption a bit. I wonder how they define online?

(via Survey Shows How Journalists Really Feel About the Digital Evolution)

“I think we’re getting to the point where I don’t even know what a mobile device is anymore. If I have a laptop and the laptop has a detachable touchscreen, is that mobile or a desktop? If I have a phone with a really large screen, is that a handheld or a tablet? If people take tablets and attach a keyboard, is that a tablet or desktop? These things have happened only in the last couple of years. If you look at how fast the user behavior is changing, we began to feel that it’s really important to understand for our advertisers the right way to reach users independent of device and look at the context around them to serve the right ad.”

AdWeek