Archives For Quotables

When you invent the ship, you also invent the shipwreck; when you invent the plane you also invent the plane crash; and when you invent electricity, you invent electrocution… Every technology carries its own negativity, which is invented at the same time as technical progress. – Paul Virillio

Virillio believed in this idea of the “integral accident” — that any technology is paired with the accidents it can create…

The integral accident (wikipedia)
Virilio believed that technology cannot exist without the potential for accidents. For example, Virilio argued that the invention of the locomotive also contained the invention of derailment. He saw the Accident as a rather negative growth of social positivism and scientific progress. He believed the growth of technology, namely television, separates us directly from the events of real space and real time. In it he suggested we lose wisdom and sight of our immediate horizon and resort to the indirect horizon of our dissimulated environment. From this angle, the Accident can be mentally pictured as a sort of “fractal meteorite” whose impact is prepared in the propitious darkness, a landscape of events concealing future collisions. Aristotle claimed that “there is no science of the accident”, but Virilio disagreed, pointing to the growing credibility of simulators designed to escape the accident— which he argued is an industry that is born from the unholy marriage of post-WW2 science and the military-industrial complex.
Paul Virillio is new to me, but there’s a lot here to unpack I’m going to be diving into.
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“Don’t give them what you think they want.

Give them what they never thought was possible.”

Orson Welles

I sometimes hear about work described in terms of ‘originality’ or ‘breakthrough,’ but my personal experience is quite different. For me music has always been about lineage. The past is reinvented and becomes the future. But the lineage is everything.

 

Philip Glass, Words Without Music

Wherever men have lived there is a story to be told, and it depends chiefly on the story-teller or historian whether that is interesting or not. You are simply a witness on the stand to tell what you know about your neighbors and neighborhood.

–Henry David Thoreau (journal, March 18, 1861)

Great comedians like Mitch Hedberg make us feel as though we’re hearing something we’ve known for eternity, yet also experiencing for the first time — revealing obvious truths in surprising ways.

Every brand or product has multiple truths. One of those will be surprising. When you find a surprising truth, people can’t just file it away. It’s psychology. Their minds have to stop and make sense of it.

Like comedy, a creative brief should make you feel uncomfortable. That means it’s working. If it doesn’t make you feel anything, it’s a dead end.

Source: Four Comedy Rules to Use in Strategy | Agency News: Viewpoint – AdAge

I’m only at 354 of 975 total pages of the digital copy of Cory Doctorow’s new book, Walkway.

Yet I’m highly enjoying the paradox between the haves and have nots, impacted mostly by those who are excited about thinking differently and embracing new technology — and those who are not.

Here’s how one of his characters classifies this natural resistance to change in the book…

“Anything invented before you were eighteen was there all along.

Anything invented before you’re thirty is exciting and will change the world forever.

Anything invented after that is an abomination and should be banned.”

–Excerpt From Cory Doctorow’s “Walkaway.”

To be clear, this isn’t how I think. But it’s how a lot of people think — consciously or not.

As a student of how people are influenced, this topic fascinates me. Looking forward to finishing Walkway soon…

“The AI neither hates you, nor loves you, but you are made out of atoms that it can use for something else.”

–Eliezer Yudkowsky, A.I. theorist