Archives For Creativity and Innovation

 

The NYT Innovation Report in 2014 was so raw and smart and poignant I literally took my clients brand names and swapped them with “NYT” and walked clients through the analysis as if it was their own digital/content strategy assessment.

Today, the NYT released its latest version of that report, and although it’s less dire and impactful than the 2014 report, it remains an important read for us students of storytelling, media and how humans get their news.

Key quotes from the Poynter summary:

  • The New York Times will dedicate $5 million to coverage of the Trump administration’s effect on the world.
  • A dozen new visual-first journalists are coming aboard. By the middle of the year, each major news desk will be paired with a deputy editor that has a “full range of creative skills” to promote non-traditional storytelling.
  • Major stories will be tackled by thematic teams — departments be damned.
  • Create (another) innovation team: “We can’t pursue every idea; but we must pursue some of them. Every corner of the newsroom has ideas for what those should be, but they don’t have enough places to pitch them. We will form a new team to solicit those big ideas, and bring the best of them to life. We believe this team can help foster a culture of innovation and experimentation across the newsroom, and can encourage journalists to think beyond their current beat.”

Read the 2017 report here.

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Revisiting The Cult of Done Manifesto every so often is always worth it.

Behind Pixar’s string of hit movies, says the studio’s president, is a peer-driven process for solving problems and how physical office space impacts culture…

How Pixar Fosters Collective Creativity

Trends emerge when basic human needs bump up against external change to create (or unlock) new needs, wants & desires.

Consumer trends are, at their heart, an essential part of uncovering innovation opportunities. Otherwise they’re just intellectual masturbation: diverting, pleasant and entertaining, but with little real purpose.

Source: trendwatching.com’s October 2013 Trend Briefing “CONSUMER TREND CANVAS”

“The problem with smart people is that they are used to seeking and finding the right answer; unfortunately, in strategy there is no single right answer to find. Strategy requires making choices about an uncertain future. It is not possible, no matter how much of the ocean you boil, to discover the one right answer. There isn’t one. In fact, even after the fact, there is no way to determine that one’s strategy choice was “right,” because there is no way to judge the relative quality of any path against all the paths not actually chosen. There are no double-blind experiments in strategy.

To be a great strategist, we have to step back from the need to find a right answer and to get accolades for identifying it. The best strategists aren’t intimidated or paralyzed by uncertainty and ambiguity; they are creative enough to imagine possibilities that may or may not actually exist and are willing to try a course of action knowing full well that it will have to be tweaked or even overhauled entirely as events unfold.”

Why Smart People Struggle with Strategy, Harvard Business Review

“While technology provides headwinds, it also provides great opportunities to see past them and say, ‘OK, I can get on the other side of this and use it to my advantage.'”

via Fox’s Jim Gianopulos Leads Studio Through Uncertain Times | Variety.

[via MediaRedefined]

The Ball jar, originally made for canning and storing foods, which has now been appropriated by hipsters and those looking for a travel mug not over-excessively utilitarian, was never intended to be used as it now often is.  Designers have struggled countless hours in many design firms and offices across the globe to create the perfect, stylish mug.  It is the “non-designed” object that sometimes gains attention and garners much unexpected use.  

via Being and Dying.