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greg swan wcco disposable social media snapchat facebook poke

Weber Shandwick’s VP of Interactive Greg Swan tracks social media trends. Even he can’t predict where kids will end up next, but he says parents should still try. It should be not to spy, but to understand the issues their kids face as new apps keep emerging.

“There are definitely some apps parents are not going to find any reward in: poking each other or sending snap shot pictures of each other, but I encourage them to try it and figure it out,” said Swan.

That may be the key to security in this new media world: focusless on backseat driving, and more on teaching the rules of the road….

Swan added that he actually likes this new wave of disposable media because unless somebody saves a screen shot, those stupid pictures kids may be tempted to post won’t stay around to haunt them in the future.

Watch the piece here.

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For more than a year I’ve been downloading my Snapchat stories each day, then uploading them to Facebook (with Privacy settings at “Just Me”).

While I love the concept of disposable media and data impermanence, I also wanted to save a lot of those memories to relive later. Especially of my small kids.

Source: Snapchat introduces Memories: a searchable, shareable archive of your snaps | The Verge

“Social” has come to mean the exact opposite of what it’s meant for centuries. Instead of actual interaction and communication, we define “social” as once- or twice-removed ego validation through button-clicking.

“Social” is what happens when someone posts personal information—photos, thoughts, announcements, favorite songs, jokes—on the internet and another person comes along and clicks a thumbs up icon or a star or a heart. If someone’s really “social,” they’ll even type a comment or reply.

Kids aren’t leaving social networks. They’re redefining the word “social.” Rather, they’re actually using the word with the intent of its original meaning: making contact with other human beings. Communicating. Back-and-forth, fairly immediate dialogue. Most of it digitally. But most of it with the intent of a conversation where two or more people are exchanging information and emotion. Not posting it. Exchanging it.

That’s “social.”

via Teens aren’t abandoning “social.” They’re just using the word correctly. — Understandings & Epiphanies — Medium.

 

See also my take on this study back in April:
The latest in “teens ditching Facebook” research

Plus:
Are disposable media platforms like Snapchat and Poke the future of social media?
The New Yorker: Delete This When You’re Done
 

Facebook Stories Coming to Brands: You know those empty circles at the top of your Facebook app where none of your friends are sharing stories? Soon they will be filled with Stories from brands, news publishers, athletes, entertainers and nonprofits. The feature is rolling out over the coming month to all pages, which Facebook sees as their strategy to drive adoption. With the extreme adoption of Snapchat and Instagram Stories, and the continued rise of disposable media messaging, we see huge potential in brands telling short-form, chronological stories. Adoption has been slow on Facebook, but this could be the tipping point. (LINK)

 

Snapchat’s Context Cards: This week Snapchat introduced context cards, which add contextual information to geotagged photos and images shared in public stories. Users can swipe up on any snap that displays the word “more” and they’ll see an interactive card pop up with options to engage with OpenTable, TripAdvisor, Lyft and more. Now you never have to leave the Snapchat app! Isn’t that great? (LINK)

 

Facebook, Bring Me Dinner: Speaking of never leaving the app, this week Facebook announced a new feature that allows users to order food from local restaurants using its app. Users can find the new option “Order Food” in the Explore menu in the Facebook app, where you can then browse area restaurants and click “Start Order” when you know what you want. Some early criticism is that Facebook is doing too many things and ordering food isn’t hard in 2017. But we’re watching for ad units that result in a “Like” for delivery. (LINK)

 

How Machine Learning Finds You New Music: Every Monday more than 100 million Spotify users encounter a hot new playlist created just for them, and it’s worth mentioning because people LOVE IT. Oh, and robots make the mixtape. It’s called Discovery Weekly, and it’s a playlist of 30 songs that are algorithmically tuned just to you. We’re geeking out on the science of their music recommendation engine: Collaborative Filtering, Natural Language Processing and Raw Audio Models. Sorry friends, we may never take a human-based musical recommendation again. (LINK)

 

#WomenBoycottTwitter: Sparked by Twitter’s temporary suspension of Rose McGowan’s account earlier this week after she and many others came forward with their Harvey Weinstein stories, women across the world are showing solidarity by falling silent on Twitter for one day. Today. Hundreds of women, including actress Alyssa Milano and model Chrissy Teigen, have said they will not post anything to the microblogging platform on Friday, “in protest of women’s voices being silenced.” Other influential folks like Ava DuVernay chimed in with another perspective, posing questions about which women we’re willing to back and if #WomenBoycottTwitter is truly intersectional. Questlove echoed her sentiments saying he’s on board to support women, so long as we remember that Jemele Hill is also facing backlash for her free speech. We’re watching, but more importantly, we’re listening. (LINK)

I’ve been a vocal advocate (opposite of critic!) for disposable media apps like Snapchat and Facebook for some time.

A recent report from BI Intelligence shows that among the 544 million daily photos uploaded in May 2013, 28 percent of those were Snapchat — beating Instagram and Flickr handily.

snapchat popularity

 

As Bob Lefsetz said in his post Facebook is For Old People, “The oldsters are rarely early adopters. They know the value of money, they’re set in their ways. For all the old bloviators bemoaning the loss of privacy online, it’s the kids who got the memo, that if they post pictures of illicit activity they might not get a job in the future. Kids believe in evanescence, oldsters believe in the permanent record. Ergo, the growth of Snapchat.”

 

In fact, once I hit the renewal date on my Flickr Premium account, I never renewed. And now I’ve forgotten the password. I still love Flickr, but I don’t use it — and send 10x more Snapchat and Facebook Poke photos than I publicly publish to the social web.

You would think the track record of social network migration (i.e. users emigrating from Compuserve to AOL, AOL to Friendster, Friendster to MySpace, more recently MySpace to Facebook) would have established a trend of cyclical change which we marketers would anticipate and embrace. But for some reason it seems like our clients and peers are always surprised when online behavior changes, new destinations gain traction, and popular networks lose daily active users.

A new survey by Piper Jaffray offers the latest news bite that will have our industry and clients asking us questions about social marketing programs on current and emerging socnets.

Via Buzzfeed:

Facebook is the “most important” social media site for about 10% fewer teenagers than it was a year ago. The teens surveyed are less interested in Twitter, YouTube, Google+, Flickr and Tumblr, too. Of the major sites included in the survey, only Pinterest has grown. (Instagram was not included in the survey in Spring of 2012). This suggests something bigger than a shift away from Facebook; it hints at what could be the beginning of an across-the-board teen rejection of traditional social networking as a whole. But where are young people going? The survey includes some notable write-ins, which are presented almost as a footnote.

But they might explain what’s going on:
piper graphic

The sites that are either ascendant, holding steady or holding relatively strong are feed-heavy and profile-light; the sites that seem to be hit hardest are those that have a more traditional, MySpace-y structures, centered around a detailed profile. (Tumblr is the odd exception here.)

The biggest “write-in” services aren’t really social networks in the way Facebook is a social network. Snapchat and Kik are messaging services. While they might be able to draw teens’ attention away from Facebook, they have little funcional overlap.

This data measures sentiment, not usage stats. If this data is solid, though, we should see it reflected in an teen exodus from traditional social networks.

While I strongly believe Vine and disposable media socnets like Snapchat, Kik and Poke satisfy important emerging consumer behaviors, we shouldn’t discount the effectiveness of mass socnets like Facebook and Twitter – just as we don’t discount the effective of mass media channels like television and newspapers to meet specific client needs. Particularly with Facebook’s new targeting offerings, we can now laser target client messages like never before.

In summary, depending on your brand’s measurable objectives, you should recommend and utilize the most appropriate channel to best meet their audiences.

What works today may not work next year, and I personally think that’s AWESOME.

Research:
“Taking Stock with Teens” study (pdf)

Bonus links:
The New Yorker: Delete This When You’re Done
Are disposable media platforms like Snapchat and Poke the future of social media?

Greg Swan Snapchat space150

Just over three years ago I was on WCCO explaining that Snapchat was the next big thing. Fast forward to 2016, and it’s been pretty fantastic experimenting with how brands interact with consumers in the popular chat app.

Specifically, at space150 this year we ran our summer internship program through Snapchat. We were the first company to advertise jobs exclusively through Snapchat geofilters, and the results have been extremely successful.

Here are a few of the filters we blanketed 29 colleges campuses from LA to NY with…

space150 Snapchat Tinder

space150 Snapchat SuhDude

space150 Snapchat Work Work

And here’s some of the media buzz about the program…

The Next Web: Your Snapchat story could soon land you a job:

How a person comes across on paper and in person or on film can be very different so combining a social element with someone’s academic and professional record is a much better approach to getting a full picture of the individual. Here’s to hoping more companies adopt this application process in the future and ditch the age-old application forms.

Campaign/PR Week: Agency uses Snapchat geofilters to hunt for interns:

This is the first time the agency has dedicated the entire recruitment process to Snapchat. Greg Swan, vice president of social, public relations and emerging media, says the social-media platform is already a place where students connect with friends and influencers. For an agency that receives 100 applications for every open intern position, Snapchat makes it easier to find what Swan calls “thinkers, disrupters and visionaries.”

“Whereas using Twitter to recruit was a story in 2009,” he says, “today’s recruiting medium of choice for top social-minded candidates is Snapchat.”

Candidates are expected to create a “snap story” to promote one of space150’s clients, a list that includes Nike, Buffalo Wild Wings and American Express. But there’s a twist: the story should be targeted at audiences in the year 2020. The agency will review the stories after an April 10 deadline and top candidates will be interviewed for an annual program that begins in June.

Swan says, “We wanted to cut through the traditional intern outreach and make something that captured attention and catalyzed candidates to spread the word for us.”

DigiDay: An agency is using Snapchat geofilters to find interns:

Instead of relying on standard resumes and interviews, the agency is challenging candidates to create a Snapchat story for the Space150 client of their choice — for the year 2020.

And for our local CBS-affiliate story, we even geofilter bombed their office. Because that’s a thing you can do now…

WCCO: Local company seeks interns through Snapchat:

“We are always looking for the next big thing, and to think about how we can connect with consumers in a channel that matters to them,” said Swan.

Snapchat space150 Greg Swan Jason DeRusha

To-date we’ve received more than 115 Snapchat applications. More #’s soon.

And here’s a look at the intern program: